Fran - A Blog for Principals and Teachers - School Matters | A Blog for Principals and Teachers – School Matters

 
 

Author Archive: Fran

 
 
New Study: Charter School Graduates More Likely to Go to College

New Study: Charter School Graduates More Likely to Go to College

Guest Post by Ember Reichgott Junge   The National Charter Schools Conference opened this morning with a standing-room-only crowd for the first general session—due to a record-breaking 4,600+ attendees to the conference!  True, the conference site in Las Vegas may be attractive to some, but remember, it is  111 degrees outside!  In my view, people […]

 
Charter Schools:  Bipartisanship Rises Up in Washington DC!

Charter Schools: Bipartisanship Rises Up in Washington DC!

 I was pleased to join Minnesota Congressman John Kline, chair of the House Education and Workforce Committee, as he announced new federal charter schools legislation at Global Academy in Columbia Heights on March 31.  Rep. Kline was joined by Rep. Luke Messer (R-Indiana), chair of the House School Choice Caucus, Greg Richmond, President and CEO […]

 
The Debate For an Extended School Day

The Debate For an Extended School Day

    Hertz Furniture video blogger Mor Rossler discusses the debate for an extended school day. Many argue that we should be focusing on improving the quality of classrooms and teaching rather than paying teachers more for extra hours. Watch the video and learn more about the debate for en extended school day. What do […]

 
Happy Holidays from Hertz Furniture

Happy Holidays from Hertz Furniture

Whether you’re a new customer or have been with us for many years; whether you’ve purchased one item or outfitted a complete campus — thank you for choosing Hertz Furniture. We value your trust and strive to win your business every day.

 
Is An Elementary Teacher’s Pay Really That Bad?

Is An Elementary Teacher’s Pay Really That Bad?

Is an Elementary Teacher’s salary really that bad? How does teacher pay compare? For decades, researchers have asked whether teacher compensation has kept pace with outside job opportunities, and whether compensation is sufficiently competitive to attract the quality of instructors desired. Review the data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics in this education infographic and decide for yourself.

 
Inspired Leaders vs. Imposed Leaders: Which are you?

Inspired Leaders vs. Imposed Leaders: Which are you?

Go to any bookstore and you will find multiple shelves stacked with books that focus on nothing else but leadership. One might discuss how to become a leader, another how to remain a leader and another try to describe what is a leader in the first place.

Not to be outdone, I would like to offer a simple definition of leadership (not my own, but I have no recollection where I heard it) and discuss its implications for school leadership.

 
The Golden Rule Revisited

The Golden Rule Revisited

Has it been over 2000 years already? Time seems to fly by when you’re having so much fun. Of course, I’m talking about all those philosophical discussions that have taken place trying to figure out the secret to raising the moral child. Many of us feel it is of upmost importance for schools to be involved in this worthwhile pursuit; the question is in what capacity?

 
Moral Education: Is it for children?

Moral Education: Is it for children?

I hope you’re not one of the many people whose eyes start to glaze over when we begin to talk about the place of moral education in our schools. “Shouldn’t that be left to religion?” is a frequently heard comment. But the most common is, “Aren’t they a bit young to start thinking about stuff […]

 
Just Say No Way

Just Say No Way

I know you’re going to call me naive. I know you’re going to say that simple solutions to complex problems can do more harm than good. I’m even reminded of a mental health professional who remarked that the ‘Just Say No” campaign to battle teenage substance abuse was like trying to battle the problem of homelessness by giving everyone a button saying “Just Buy A Home”. This would certainly hold true when speaking of dealing with bullies. But I’m going to throw it out there anyhow.

 
To Lead or not to Lead? School Leadership and Management

To Lead or not to Lead? School Leadership and Management

Principals are busy people. It is no secret that all principals are required to wear a variety of ‘hats’, assuming the role of manager, social worker, leader, fund raiser, to name just a few. In many instances it is the ability of principals to juggle these ‘hats’ that determines their professional success or failure.

 
Chasing Excellence and Catching Greatness Along The Way

Chasing Excellence and Catching Greatness Along The Way

What is the secret to the great teacher? What is it that defines the master educator? Mastery of the subject being taught is essential, as is a passion for the subject as well as for transferring knowledge or skill to students. Additionally, one would require some training or natural talent in order to employ the most effective methodologies available. Mastery, passion, training and talent; impressive, but something is missing.

 
Virtual Learning

Virtual Learning

I always teach my kids never to call anyone stupid. So you’ll have to excuse me for my language when I ask, “How stupid can they be?” No, I’m not referring to my kids, I’m referring to all those who are riding the wave of the newest craze, virtual education.

 
Why Don’t We Talk Anymore?

Why Don’t We Talk Anymore?

Why? Let’s be frank, it’s usually because I don’t particularly care to talk to you. This holds true in social relationships and it holds true in parent- teacher communication. We simply don’t want to talk.

 
Why do I have to know this stuff?

Why do I have to know this stuff?

We have previously argued that educators must play the role of both facilitating the learning process and filtering the acquired knowledge so that students not only learn but also know what they must remember. The expiration date of unfiltered knowledge will be determined by the date of the final test. The point made was that if students are asked to remember almost everything they learn, (an impossible task) they will respond by forgetting almost everything they learn. Clearly communicating to students which knowledge is of enduring value is the key to solving the ‘why our students know so little’ syndrome.

 
Why do our children learn so much and yet know so little? – Part One

Why do our children learn so much and yet know so little? – Part One

Renowned humorist Dave Barry reflects on his college experience and writes:

College is basically a bunch of rooms where you sit for roughly two thousand hours and try to memorize things… Basically, you learn two kinds of things in college:

Things you will need to know in later life (two hours). These include how to make collect telephone calls and get beer and crepe-paper stains out of your pajamas.

Things you will not need to know in later life (1,998 hours). These are the things you learn in classes whose names end in -ology, – - -osophy, -istry, -ics, and so on. The idea is, you memorize these things, then write them down in little exam books, then forget them…

After you’ve been in college for a year or so, you’re supposed to choose a major, which is the subject you intend to memorize and forget the most things about.

While Barry may be somewhat diminishing the value of a college education, he has hit upon an important issue that effects schooling at almost every level. Put simply we may ask: Why do our children learn so much and yet know so little?