Why do our children learn so much and yet know so little? - Part One | A Blog for Principals and Teachers – School Matters

 
 

Why do our children learn so much and yet know so little? – Part One

 
 

 

 

iStock 000015180428XSmall 150x150 Why do our children learn so much and yet know so little?   Part One Renowned humorist Dave Barry reflects on his college experience and writes:

College is basically a bunch of rooms where you sit for roughly two thousand hours and try to memorize things… Basically, you learn two kinds of things in college:

Things you will need to know in later life (two hours). These include how to make collect telephone calls and get beer and crepe-paper stains out of your pajamas.

Things you will not need to know in later life (1,998 hours). These are the things you learn in classes whose names end in -ology, – - -osophy, -istry, -ics, and so on. The idea is, you memorize these things, then write them down in little exam books, then forget them…

After you’ve been in college for a year or so, you’re supposed to choose a major, which is the subject you intend to memorize and forget the most things about.

While Barry may be somewhat diminishing the value of a college education, he has hit upon an important issue that effects schooling at almost every level. Put simply we may ask: Why do our children learn so much and yet know so little?

All humor aside, there is a significant concern here. What is really being described above is the fact that our children seem to spend an enormous amount of time in the classroom but leave with little knowledge to show for their efforts. We have talented teachers who dedicate their lives to their students and yet students forget almost all they learn, with only hazy recollection of the things they do manage to remember. Why does this happen, and what can we do about it?

As is the case with almost every issue, the problem is complex with no one solution. Obviously cramming information, uninspired teaching or lack of creativity will yield the above results. However, I believe the problem is deeper. I have seen many excellent teachers whose students still will finish their day and when asked, “What did you learn today?” will still answer, “Nothing”. Why does this happen?

Teachers play many roles. One of those roles is a disseminator of information. What is frequently overlooked is that teachers must also act as distillers of that very same information. Students are taught a dizzying array of facts and provided with a deep and wide exposure to the collected knowledge of the ages. But, does anyone filter all of the above for the students with all the student learning that they are doing? Too frequently not. Students cannot remember it all; they therefore choose the other option, to forget it all.

But, how does one choose? What criteria should a teacher use to make such decisions? And, how does the teacher communicate these expectations to students? I would argue that until educators can effectively answer the above questions, Mr. Barry’s humorous reflections will continue to be the rule rather than the exception.

Share and Enjoy:
  • twitter Why do our children learn so much and yet know so little?   Part One
  • linkedin Why do our children learn so much and yet know so little?   Part One
  • facebook Why do our children learn so much and yet know so little?   Part One
  • googlebookmark Why do our children learn so much and yet know so little?   Part One
 

5 Comments

  1. Donna says:

    They wonder why the kids are so tired and can’t figure things out. It’s because when you force the brain to think at a higher level it makes their bodies react. They are in turmoil and it just boils down to kids can’t be kids anymore. They are mini adults !

    • Karmi says:

      Donna, that is an interesting take on the situation. Do you think that we shouldn’t be making the students think on a higher level? Should we be giving them more breaks to act like kids? What is the solution?

  2. You make some really interesting points here. I think this is where the way the students are taught comes into play. I believe there needs to be more student centred learning approaches taken rather than the teacher delivering the information. Students need opportunities to explore, engage in hands on activities and guide their own learning with the teacher as the facilitator of the learning.

    • Karmi says:

      You make a fabulous point. Unfortunately teacher centered teaching is the reality in many (most?) schools. In all cases, teachers need to think through the way they are presenting knowledge.

  3. there are too many pedagogical distractions in schools , , teachers also need to beg pupils to learn unlike in the past Victorian period..

    join the groups on facebook “”Education Problems “”and the group “Teachers Problems”

    christian yow sang
    teacher since 1991
    Mauritius island indian ocean

Post a Comment


 

Educators Calendar Events

Featured Posts

Is Social Media in the Classroom a Necessity or Distraction?

Is Social Media in the Classroom a Necessity or Distraction?

I recently had a telling experience while sitting at a friend’s dinner table. The mother asked her son how his class was today. He answered, “It got deleted”....

 
Video: The Myths of Chartering

Video: The Myths of Chartering

Guest Post by Ember Reichgott Junge   What a fun interview with Bob Bowdon of Choice Media TV, in New York City! We talked chartering and education issues from...

 
Are Single Gender Classrooms Better?

Are Single Gender Classrooms Better?

From time immemorial, private religious schools have had single gender classrooms. For the past 15 some odd years, a few public schools have begun to experiment...

 
New Literacy Law-Too Much and Too Late?

New Literacy Law-Too Much and Too Late?

In the continuing effort to get our children reading, fourteen states have enacted a policy requiring third-graders who do not meet a reading standard to attend...

 
Obama’s Nutritional Standards Strike Again

Obama’s Nutritional Standards Strike Again

  I read a rather heartbreaking story about the loss of a home-town treat to the Obama administration’s nutritional guidelines. Apparently, Michelle Obama’s...

 
Video: Play Based Learning

Video: Play Based Learning

      Video blogger Mor Rossler discusses play based learning. Learning through play has become the goal of many early childhood centers.  The idea is that...

 
Charter Schools and Unions – Help or Hindrance?

Charter Schools and Unions – Help or Hindrance?

A reader of my recent blog, Charter Schools-Nothing Ventured, Nothing Gained?, commented that perhaps one of the disadvantages of charter schools is that teachers...

 
Infographic: What Makes An Effective Teacher? Part III

Infographic: What Makes An Effective Teacher? Part III

  Hertz Furniture is proud to present the What Makes An Effective Teacher? infographic series!  Student influences such as attention span, cultural background...

 
Facing Gender Differences in Education

Facing Gender Differences in Education

Published in 1992 and having sold over 50 million copies! (not including the sharing of the book between readers), Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus by John...

 
New Study: Charter School Graduates More Likely to Go to College

New Study: Charter School Graduates More Likely to Go to College

Guest Post by Ember Reichgott Junge   The National Charter Schools Conference opened this morning with a standing-room-only crowd for the first general session—due...