Infographic: Teachers Spend Their Own Money on Classroom Necessities | A Blog for Principals and Teachers – School Matters

 
 

Infographic: Teachers Spend Their Own Money on Classroom Necessities

 
 

 

 

teacher spend info jpg1 Infographic: Teachers Spend Their Own Money on Classroom Necessities

Teachers spend an incredible amount of their own money on classroom necessities including  instructional material, school supplies and classroom supplies during each school year.  Take a look at the infographic which addresses the important educational questions of just how much are teachers spending, is it a teacher’s responsibility to pay for classroom necessities and are there solutions to this problem?


We are curious to hear how much you are spending on your classroom,whether you think it is justifiable for teachers to be spending their own money and what the solution is to this issue so please let us know.


spending icon Infographic: Teachers Spend Their Own Money on Classroom Necessities

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If you enjoyed this infographic take a look at one of our most popular infographics and see if an elementary teacher’s salary is really so bad!


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9 Comments

  1. milissa smith says:

    I am a Teacher, yes we do spend our own money. Its a choice. I love what I do, that’s why I do it. It would be great for businesses to visit schools and ask teachers for a wish list and help meet the needs of educating students.

  2. Celina Bialt says:

    I have already spent over $600 in materials for my class. I will probably spend over$1000 before the year is out. That does not include time given for free. We are forced to spend our own money if we want to be “effective” teachers. Imagine having to teach measurement without rulers. I had to do that my first year because I needed so many things rulers didn’t make the top of my list until my 2nd year.

    • Jonahan Yunger says:

      Thanks for sharing your experience with us, Celina. It sound like you are doing your best to be an effective teacher. What do you think is the solution to this problem?

  3. Teachers spend a lot that’s the fact, but actually spending is not all that makes teaching effective, there are some little little things like proper classroom management and good teaching qualities that are needed.

  4. Stephanie G. says:

    I recently Transfered schools. I moved from a school in an affluent neighborhood to a school in a low income area. I was surprised to see how few supplies this school has. I have had to buy basic supplies so my classroom can run smoothly… Such as baskets to organize my books (which I’m still working on purchasing), art and center supplies so my kids can enjoy the fun side of learning, wires and other computer supplies to make my smart board actually work, as well as the every day supplies….

  5. Wonderful infographic and the statistics are sad but true. Teachers are undoubtedly some of the most underpaid, underrated and neglected professionals in the world. Educators who are passionate about their work understand their students often need much more than the school systems are willing to provide them. Thanks for recommending organizations like RAFT and Adopt-A-Classroom. We need all the resources we can find!

  6. daveeckstrom says:

    Lots of professionals in other fields do the same. Sometimes the red tape isn’t worth the wait. Sometimes you really believe in something that your bosses can’t understand. It happens.

    The difference is, for other professionals there is an eventual payoff. At some point going the extra mile pays off in a raise, promotion, better offer or something.

    In teaching, that money is gone forever. And next year you do it again. And again. And again. And then your governor says you’re lazy and overpaid, cuts your compensation by 12% and removes your union protection.

    And then the next year you do it again. Why?

    • Jonathan says:

      You are right to point out that in other professions, people lay out money from time to time, as well. You are also correct that in education that financial investment doesn’t often yield financial returns.Why do it again, you ask? I suppose the answer to that question is a subjective one. But I know many teachers who keep at it year to year because despite the financial strain, they are driven by a deep desire to help young people reach their potential. What do you think?

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