Video: Inquiry-Based Learning vs. Direct Learning | A Blog for Principals and Teachers – School Matters

 
 

Video: Inquiry-Based Learning vs. Direct Learning

 
 

 

 

 

Should teachers serve primarily as presenters of predetermined material or facilitators of student-initiated learning? Hertz Furniture video blogger Mor Rossler compares the strengths and weaknesses of inquiry-based learning and direct learning; watch the video to learn more about this fundamental pedagogical issue. What has been your experience with these two modes of classroom learning? Please share your thoughts with us!

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2 Comments

  1. Cindy Scott says:

    I have a couple of thoughts about this. First, if only it were that easy—to stand in front of a class and “pour” the information into their brains, test them, and be done. Just because a teacher has worked hard to prepare an organized lesson plan, does not mean it will reach the learners. Each child has very different interest levels, prior knowledge, and learning styles or abilities. The chances that you connect with a large percentage of children in this way seems remote to me.

    My experience has shown me that allowing children to learn about a topic of their choice is ideal. Then, the teacher shares integrated language skills as needed for vocabulary, writing, research and so on. It is more respectful for a child, and the learning is more complete.

    As for children who do not choose a particular subject for a long period of time, it is important for a teacher to somehow entice the child through one of their interests. It’s not that hard to add math, writing, or science to any topic. If we can tolerate not having total control and allowing more free choices, children almost always get around to learning all subjects.

    Thanks for this–I just found the blog through G+ and all of the topics are very interesting to me! I subscribed :)

    • Mor says:

      Thank you Cindy, I couldn’t agree with you more. A student will learn best and commit themselves to developing knowledge when it is a subject matter that interests them. An educator can create a web of lesson plans spanning all topics (math, language, science etc) with almost any subject matter. Although this can be difficult for an educator, it’s important to remember that we are not teaching the subject to a learner, we are teaching the learner a subject and not every learner gains knowledge the same way.
      Thank you for your comment and looking forward to many more!

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